Took the extra hour today to make these breakfast tacos and I have no regrets. Scrambled eggs with sautéed mushrooms, topped with feta and chopped bacon, all in a warm corn tortilla. If my spanish were better I would end this post with something more clever.

Took the extra hour today to make these breakfast tacos and I have no regrets. Scrambled eggs with sautéed mushrooms, topped with feta and chopped bacon, all in a warm corn tortilla. If my spanish were better I would end this post with something more clever.



Surf & Turf
Dinner tonight was lemon pepper shrimp, steak & mushrooms, served with steamed broccoli and long grain wild rice pilaf. 
What worked:
-Steak was juicy and tender. Cook at a high heat while the steaks are whole and let them sit for 5 minutes to let the juices settle.
-Shrimp was cooked well, i.e. not tough. Do your wallet a favor and don’t go for the “fresh” shrimp behind the counter, which is often actually just thawed frozen shrimp #themoreyouknow
What didn’t work
-Sliiiiiightly undercooked rice as I didn’t have a lid for the saucepan I was using. Tried to improvise with foil, to no avail. Womp womp
-I was lazy and didn’t want to use another pan, so the food wasn’t all at one temperature when it came time to plate it.
If my language seems Top Chefier than usual… well, turn on a TV.

Surf & Turf

Dinner tonight was lemon pepper shrimp, steak & mushrooms, served with steamed broccoli and long grain wild rice pilaf. 

What worked:

-Steak was juicy and tender. Cook at a high heat while the steaks are whole and let them sit for 5 minutes to let the juices settle.

-Shrimp was cooked well, i.e. not tough. Do your wallet a favor and don’t go for the “fresh” shrimp behind the counter, which is often actually just thawed frozen shrimp #themoreyouknow

What didn’t work

-Sliiiiiightly undercooked rice as I didn’t have a lid for the saucepan I was using. Tried to improvise with foil, to no avail. Womp womp

-I was lazy and didn’t want to use another pan, so the food wasn’t all at one temperature when it came time to plate it.

If my language seems Top Chefier than usual… well, turn on a TV.


Cook yer pasta quickly
Last week, Chow put up this video explaining how to cook pasta quickly in a frying pan. We put it to a quick test and found that it worked great! If you’re too lazy to watch a 44 second video, you’ve probably stopped reading already. But long story short, you put pasta in cold water in a frying pan and bring it to a boil until fully cooked.

Cook yer pasta quickly

Last week, Chow put up this video explaining how to cook pasta quickly in a frying pan. We put it to a quick test and found that it worked great! If you’re too lazy to watch a 44 second video, you’ve probably stopped reading already. But long story short, you put pasta in cold water in a frying pan and bring it to a boil until fully cooked.


Accidental Vegan
If you have friends who claim tofu doesn’t taste like anything, it’s because they haven’t had it done right. This dish is fried tofu, edamame, and brown rice with a little bit of soy sauce, rice vinegar, and sesame oil. Really simple and apparently like vegan or something.
Fried Tofu
Use a block of firm tofu and press out the liquid. To press the tofu, put it on a plate on top of paper towels, then put a bowl or two on top of the tofu and let the liquids drain out. Cut it into small cubes and coat in a light layer of flour. Fry these up in some vegetable oil until good and crispy and let cool.
Add some boiled edamame (I did it the hard way, boiling the pods and popping them out individually, although some grocers sell them out-of-the-pod) to a cup of cooked brown rice and stir in some sauce. Anything will work for your sauce, so get creative. Then throw the tofu on and you’re set!

Accidental Vegan

If you have friends who claim tofu doesn’t taste like anything, it’s because they haven’t had it done right. This dish is fried tofu, edamame, and brown rice with a little bit of soy sauce, rice vinegar, and sesame oil. Really simple and apparently like vegan or something.

Fried Tofu

Use a block of firm tofu and press out the liquid. To press the tofu, put it on a plate on top of paper towels, then put a bowl or two on top of the tofu and let the liquids drain out. Cut it into small cubes and coat in a light layer of flour. Fry these up in some vegetable oil until good and crispy and let cool.

Add some boiled edamame (I did it the hard way, boiling the pods and popping them out individually, although some grocers sell them out-of-the-pod) to a cup of cooked brown rice and stir in some sauce. Anything will work for your sauce, so get creative. Then throw the tofu on and you’re set!


What’s fer Lunch Today:
I was craving something filling but not too heavy after stress-eating a giant pizza last night. This super simple dish is spaghetti, cherry tomatoes, spinach and sautéed chicken with a tablespoon of olive oil for the sauce, topped with a spoonful of feta. 

What’s fer Lunch Today:

I was craving something filling but not too heavy after stress-eating a giant pizza last night. This super simple dish is spaghetti, cherry tomatoes, spinach and sautéed chicken with a tablespoon of olive oil for the sauce, topped with a spoonful of feta. 


I love a good reusable takeout container. This one used to hold sesame chicken, courtesy of Sichuan Gourmet in Brookline. A lot of takeout restaurants put saucier or messier dishes in these containers and I keep them all. It makes sharing food easier and a little more presentable.
The food in the background is my lunch - leftover shrimp fried rice, sesame chicken, and mapo tofu.

I love a good reusable takeout container. This one used to hold sesame chicken, courtesy of Sichuan Gourmet in Brookline. A lot of takeout restaurants put saucier or messier dishes in these containers and I keep them all. It makes sharing food easier and a little more presentable.

The food in the background is my lunch - leftover shrimp fried rice, sesame chicken, and mapo tofu.


M’s Mac&Cheese Ain’t got nothin on mine*.

Freshman Year Roommate’s Mac ‘N Cheese:

Pasta

2 cans Campbell’s Cheddar Cheese Soup

Milk

ham

bread crumbs (optional)

While the pasta is cooking, heat the 2 cans of cheddar cheese soup and 1 soup can of milk in a sauce pan. When the pasta is done, strain the pasta and put in a baking dish. Add the cheese sauce and diced ham. Sprinkle bread crumbs on top and bake at 350 until the top is golden brown.

I steamed broccoli and grilled some chicken on my George Foreman to add protein to the meal. Personally I am not sure how I feel about the processed cheese soup, but I would have to say this dish is a step up from M’s Mac&Cheese from Oct 12th.

-L


Homemade Apple Sauce
What up Mott’s! My roommate asked me if we could turn some of our apples into apple sauce. I accepted. And it was way easier than I thought.
4 apples, peeled, cored and chopped
3/4 cup water
1/4 cup sugar
1 tsp cinnamon
Pinch of nutmeg
Once you’ve got your chopped apples, you’ve done 90% of the work. Throw all the ingredients in a saucepan and heat it on medium, stirring occasionally. Once the apples are all mushy, you can remove it from heat and mash it up using a fork. Serves 4, and looks really nice in a glass jar.

Homemade Apple Sauce

What up Mott’s! My roommate asked me if we could turn some of our apples into apple sauce. I accepted. And it was way easier than I thought.

  • 4 apples, peeled, cored and chopped
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • Pinch of nutmeg

Once you’ve got your chopped apples, you’ve done 90% of the work. Throw all the ingredients in a saucepan and heat it on medium, stirring occasionally. Once the apples are all mushy, you can remove it from heat and mash it up using a fork. Serves 4, and looks really nice in a glass jar.


Ginger Soy Chicken Stir Fry
I always take an hour or so during midterms week to cook something new, for my own sanity. I’ve been doing stir fry with just sesame oil and soy sauce for a long time, but I’ve been longing for something more…
I’m not being dramatic, soy sauce is boring.
My stir fry sauce turned out very flavorful, although a bit thicker than expected. This is straight from Allrecipes, with a few very minor adjustments… although I was cheap and didn’t go for the corn syrup, which was a mistake as it made the sauce a deliciously flavorful molasses.
Stir Fry Sauce
1 tbsp. corn starch
3 tbsp. brown sugar
Crushed red pepper (to taste, or omit if that’s not yo thang)
1/2 cup corn syrup (Seriously, add this)
1/2 cup soy sauce
1 tbsp. sesame oil
1 tbsp. rice vinegar
1 tbsp. minced ginger
1 clove minced garlic
Start with your dry ingredients in a small saucepan (corn starch, brown sugar, and red pepper) and mix well. Add the rest and heat it until it comes to a boil.
The Stir Fry
I used brown rice for this stir fry and the vegetables were a fairly standard array of carrots, mushrooms, broccoli, and bean sprouts. I also had chicken thrown in there - if you’re doing a stir fry with raw meat, make sure you fire up the meat before you throw in the vegetables. This will help your meat cook thoroughly and not overcook the veggies.
While we’re here, I want to say that if you’ve been painstakingly stirring your fry in a pan, you might want to consider a cheap wok. I got mine from Ikea for $5 and it comes in handy. Woks heat up the stir fry differently than a pan, and also allow you to throw your ingredients around a bit more - great for an even distribution of sauce. Just think about it, OK?!?
Anyways, when the chicken was almost cooked thoroughly, I threw in my veggies and the sauce. If you made your sauce right, it should be thick and not stick to your wok like mine did.
A few things about the picture before we wrap up: I threw the rice in the wok, which I immediately regretted, but it’s really a matter of opinion. Also, I am in desperate need of a better quality camera.
-M

Ginger Soy Chicken Stir Fry

I always take an hour or so during midterms week to cook something new, for my own sanity. I’ve been doing stir fry with just sesame oil and soy sauce for a long time, but I’ve been longing for something more…

I’m not being dramatic, soy sauce is boring.

My stir fry sauce turned out very flavorful, although a bit thicker than expected. This is straight from Allrecipes, with a few very minor adjustments… although I was cheap and didn’t go for the corn syrup, which was a mistake as it made the sauce a deliciously flavorful molasses.

Stir Fry Sauce

  • 1 tbsp. corn starch
  • 3 tbsp. brown sugar
  • Crushed red pepper (to taste, or omit if that’s not yo thang)
  • 1/2 cup corn syrup (Seriously, add this)
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp. sesame oil
  • 1 tbsp. rice vinegar
  • 1 tbsp. minced ginger
  • 1 clove minced garlic

Start with your dry ingredients in a small saucepan (corn starch, brown sugar, and red pepper) and mix well. Add the rest and heat it until it comes to a boil.

The Stir Fry

I used brown rice for this stir fry and the vegetables were a fairly standard array of carrots, mushrooms, broccoli, and bean sprouts. I also had chicken thrown in there - if you’re doing a stir fry with raw meat, make sure you fire up the meat before you throw in the vegetables. This will help your meat cook thoroughly and not overcook the veggies.

While we’re here, I want to say that if you’ve been painstakingly stirring your fry in a pan, you might want to consider a cheap wok. I got mine from Ikea for $5 and it comes in handy. Woks heat up the stir fry differently than a pan, and also allow you to throw your ingredients around a bit more - great for an even distribution of sauce. Just think about it, OK?!?

Anyways, when the chicken was almost cooked thoroughly, I threw in my veggies and the sauce. If you made your sauce right, it should be thick and not stick to your wok like mine did.

A few things about the picture before we wrap up: I threw the rice in the wok, which I immediately regretted, but it’s really a matter of opinion. Also, I am in desperate need of a better quality camera.

-M


the South Campus Salad Bar
My apartment lacks the bountiful salad bars of the Dining Halls, so I buy fresh produce to make my own salad bar and have a quick supply for cooking at any time.
Some of my favorite salad toppings are kidney beans, feta, and raisins, but I also stock up on just about anything (such as more salad toppings like carrots or bell peppers). This week I also splurged on an avocado, and I have absolutely no regrets. Oddly enough I also really enjoy frozen peas (thawed, of course), and I choose to use spinach in place of lettuce because I find lettuce is really just like crunchy water. Spinach is tasty and much more nutritious.
If I’m making a salad, I always chop up more vegetables than I need (except the ones that will go bad quickly – like the avocado or cucumbers) and store them. That way, if I’m making a salad for dinner on Tuesday, I can fix up an omelet the next morning with mushrooms, bell pepper and avocado with very little preparation.
Happy healthy eating!
-L

the South Campus Salad Bar

My apartment lacks the bountiful salad bars of the Dining Halls, so I buy fresh produce to make my own salad bar and have a quick supply for cooking at any time.

Some of my favorite salad toppings are kidney beans, feta, and raisins, but I also stock up on just about anything (such as more salad toppings like carrots or bell peppers). This week I also splurged on an avocado, and I have absolutely no regrets. Oddly enough I also really enjoy frozen peas (thawed, of course), and I choose to use spinach in place of lettuce because I find lettuce is really just like crunchy water. Spinach is tasty and much more nutritious.

If I’m making a salad, I always chop up more vegetables than I need (except the ones that will go bad quickly – like the avocado or cucumbers) and store them. That way, if I’m making a salad for dinner on Tuesday, I can fix up an omelet the next morning with mushrooms, bell pepper and avocado with very little preparation.

Happy healthy eating!

-L


Single Serving Apple Pies
You’ll learn from reading this blog about my abusive relationship with baking. In any event, I found this recipe simple enough for even myself. I didn’t burn my apartment down, and the pies are tasty.
2 large apples - peeled, cored, and diced
2 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup sugar
1/2 tsp cinnamon
Pinch of nutmeg
One lemon
1 Package Pillsbury pie crusts (contains two)
Preheat your oven to 350°.
Dice up the apples and put them in a mixing bowl. Squeeze the lemon on them to keep them from getting brown. Mix in the rest of the ingredients and adjust to your tastes.
Take out one of the pie crusts and flatten out on a floured surface. Scoop on six or seven evenly spaced heaps of filling, making sure they’re not too close. Brush water in between the filling, and take the other pie crust and place it on top.
Press down between the filling clumps, making sure that the dough sticks together nicely (make sure you do this or you end up with pies with trap doors aka filling on the apartment floor you just cleaned). Take a small knife and cut the pies out, shaping them into sort-of rectangle/oval shapes. Be creative. Once you’ve cut your pies out, cut some slits on the top to release steam.
Put the pies on a baking sheet on top of wax paper, and bake for about 20-25 minutes, or until pies are golden brown and flaky. Take them out of the oven when they’re done and let them sit, or rush in and burn your mouth.

Single Serving Apple Pies

You’ll learn from reading this blog about my abusive relationship with baking. In any event, I found this recipe simple enough for even myself. I didn’t burn my apartment down, and the pies are tasty.

  • 2 large apples - peeled, cored, and diced
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • Pinch of nutmeg
  • One lemon
  • 1 Package Pillsbury pie crusts (contains two)

Preheat your oven to 350°.

Dice up the apples and put them in a mixing bowl. Squeeze the lemon on them to keep them from getting brown. Mix in the rest of the ingredients and adjust to your tastes.

Take out one of the pie crusts and flatten out on a floured surface. Scoop on six or seven evenly spaced heaps of filling, making sure they’re not too close. Brush water in between the filling, and take the other pie crust and place it on top.

Press down between the filling clumps, making sure that the dough sticks together nicely (make sure you do this or you end up with pies with trap doors aka filling on the apartment floor you just cleaned). Take a small knife and cut the pies out, shaping them into sort-of rectangle/oval shapes. Be creative. Once you’ve cut your pies out, cut some slits on the top to release steam.

Put the pies on a baking sheet on top of wax paper, and bake for about 20-25 minutes, or until pies are golden brown and flaky. Take them out of the oven when they’re done and let them sit, or rush in and burn your mouth.


PYO Apples
In the process of making some little apple pies! Drove 1 hour out to Franklin and they only had Cortland apples, which, according to Wikipedia is a good dessert fruit. I don’t bake.

PYO Apples

In the process of making some little apple pies! Drove 1 hour out to Franklin and they only had Cortland apples, which, according to Wikipedia is a good dessert fruit. I don’t bake.


Easy Spaghetti & Meatballs
This one’s good and feeds a good amount of people. Really simple and it doesn’t involve any frozen meatballs or Ragu. Serves 6, or 4 if your crowd is really hungry. I’m also not including a how-to on how to cook the spaghetti, but I googled it for you if you need assistance: http://tinyurl.com/6x8nte7
1. Meatballs:
Ground Beef
Breadcrumbs
Grated parmesan cheese
Italian Seasoning
Salt & pepper
I don’t put any measurements for this because it really depends on your tastes and how much beef you have as well. You just want to keep equal parts of breadcrumbs and parmesan. Mix all the ingredients together (get your hands bloody) and roll them up and bake them for 10 to 15 minutes until done. To make sure the recipe is tasty, I cook up a small one in the frying pan to see what I need more (or less) of in the meatballs.
Once the meatballs are in the oven, you can start on the sauce.
2. Easy Tomato Sauce
I don’t want to go out on a limb and call this marinara, but it’s most definitely more flavorful (and cheaper) than a can of Prego.
1 12-oz can Tomato Paste
18 oz water (aka 1 1/2 tomato paste cans)
1 tbsp Olive Oil
1 garlic clove
Italian seasoning
Salt & pepper to taste
Heat up the olive oil on low, and cook the garlic clove until it’s slightly darker (not burnt). Make sure you don’t have the oil up too high or else it’ll splatter everywhere and oil burns aren’t fun. Add the entire can of tomato paste to the oil (a rubber spatula would be a good tool to have now, and in general). Stir it around and add a can-and-a-half worth of water. It might look chunky and kinda narsty, but as the tomato paste mixes in it’ll start looking good. Add the seasoning and stir, throw in your meatballs and let it simmer for a few minutes.
Top some cooked spaghetti with this sauce and a few meatballs, and sprinkle on parmesan to taste. Open your apartment door to let the smell waft out so that you can make new friends.
-M

Easy Spaghetti & Meatballs

This one’s good and feeds a good amount of people. Really simple and it doesn’t involve any frozen meatballs or Ragu. Serves 6, or 4 if your crowd is really hungry. I’m also not including a how-to on how to cook the spaghetti, but I googled it for you if you need assistance: http://tinyurl.com/6x8nte7

1. Meatballs:

  • Ground Beef
  • Breadcrumbs
  • Grated parmesan cheese
  • Italian Seasoning
  • Salt & pepper

I don’t put any measurements for this because it really depends on your tastes and how much beef you have as well. You just want to keep equal parts of breadcrumbs and parmesan. Mix all the ingredients together (get your hands bloody) and roll them up and bake them for 10 to 15 minutes until done. To make sure the recipe is tasty, I cook up a small one in the frying pan to see what I need more (or less) of in the meatballs.

Once the meatballs are in the oven, you can start on the sauce.

2. Easy Tomato Sauce

I don’t want to go out on a limb and call this marinara, but it’s most definitely more flavorful (and cheaper) than a can of Prego.

  • 1 12-oz can Tomato Paste
  • 18 oz water (aka 1 1/2 tomato paste cans)
  • 1 tbsp Olive Oil
  • 1 garlic clove
  • Italian seasoning
  • Salt & pepper to taste

Heat up the olive oil on low, and cook the garlic clove until it’s slightly darker (not burnt). Make sure you don’t have the oil up too high or else it’ll splatter everywhere and oil burns aren’t fun. Add the entire can of tomato paste to the oil (a rubber spatula would be a good tool to have now, and in general). Stir it around and add a can-and-a-half worth of water. It might look chunky and kinda narsty, but as the tomato paste mixes in it’ll start looking good. Add the seasoning and stir, throw in your meatballs and let it simmer for a few minutes.

Top some cooked spaghetti with this sauce and a few meatballs, and sprinkle on parmesan to taste. Open your apartment door to let the smell waft out so that you can make new friends.

-M


Anybody want to start a BUCleans blog? Kthx. 

-M

Anybody want to start a BUCleans blog? Kthx.

-M